Viewing entries in
Misc

Comment

Pavgen

We expend a lot of energy in our every day lives, whether walking or driving, it seems only logical that we recycle that expended energy. Remember, energy can never be destroyed rather only transferred.

Any one point on a busy street can receive up to 50,000 steps a day, so imagine if you could take all that foot traffic and turn it into something useful – like energy! A new product designed by Laurence Kemball-Cook, the director of Pavegen Systems Ltd., can do just that. With a minuscule flex of 5mm, the energy generating pavement is able to absorb the kinetic energy produced by every footstep, creating 2.1 watts of electricity per hour.
Via Inhabitat

Comment

1 Comment

Kengo Kuma Water/Glass House

Love that Frank Gehry threw this up in his blog, even though its a throw back. This house designed by Kuma in 1995 achieved a very specific goal. Kuma tried to frame space with only two horizontal planes - the floor and the ceiling and to generate between the planes, a transparent and fluid time-space.

In the Western architectural tradition, a building is primarily framed by means of walls and windows. That interposes a frame between the subject and the object. The subject is inevitably cut off from the object. The space becomes a painting in a frame (i.e. a static image); it becomes frozen. On the other hand, in traditional Japanese architecture, horizontal planes (i.e. the floor and the ceiling) are the dominant framing devices. This enables the subject and the object to coexist in a continuous space, without being cut off from each other by the frame. In such a case, the main concern of planning is the introduction of a sequence and speed into a continuous space. One cannot help but introduce into the building the parameter of time as well as the parameter of space. As a result, become inextricably entwined.

1 Comment

Comment

Art Basel Miami


Hi friends, I will be documenting Art Basel Miami this year in a search for the ultimate experience. As art steps out of the realm of exclusivity and into our lives, it is the experiential element that allows anyone to appreciate it. As a layman myself, there are few pieces that really touch me and teach me about my sense and my understanding of art. The below installation will be a feature at Pulse in the center of Art Basel. David Abir is an artist, composer, philosopher and has become a dear friend. The below images do not do justice to his work, but it has changed the lives of many of my peers and has opened my eyes. These massive rooms combine a shifting of the most emotionally powerful colors and moving pieces of music David creates. I am not only happy to have experienced this in my lifetime, but excited for others to have this in their lives. I will not bore you with the typical art banter, but David's work is truly next level. Timeless, moving, and truly valuable in the emotion it evokes and the state of mind it puts one in. This is one of the great artists of our time, and we need not a museum or a gallery or a critic to tell us this, this has been validated by each and every person i've taken to his studio.


See Live coverage of David's work and others at Basel on Dec. 3!

Comment

2 Comments

Costa Rican Architect Ricardo Ramirez

Dear friends, in search for original design, sometimes it is best to rely on the young architects of our time. Ricardo Ramirez has an imagination, a passion, and a drive to create better ways to live. I've known him for about a year now, and have always been impressed by his ideas. Part artist, part architect, part young visionary, he has an amazing discipline to build structures that challenge convention yet provide a real living space. There is a tough balance to strike between one's ideas and what people would like to live in, and Ricardo does this with a graceful ease. His latest design below is being built in Costa Rica as we speak! Well done my friend and thanks for sharing it with the world.

Notice the beautiful angles allowing natural sunlight through the large windows. I love skylights but this is the ultimate sky light. I believe sun is essential for people in their everyday lives. The juxtaposition of wood and concrete, all warm up the living environment - modern yet comfortable and livable. This will be a key direction in modern design, as modernism often suffers the reality of creating a comfortable home. As an artists you want to create beauty but you also want people to live in this beauty so a balance has to be struck. Ricardo achieves this flawlessly and I am excited to see his future design!

2 Comments

Comment

Richard Meier Architect Volume 5

Thanks to my amigos at Proof7 for keeping me in the loop on the freshest of Rizzoli publications! I trust them for anything related to print, they are the mavens in NY in this regard and many others.

In celebration of Richard Meier Studio’s 45th anniversary, Rizzoli new monograph looks at the Pritzker Prize-winning American architect's recent work. Titled "Richard Meier Architect Volume 5," this latest volume reveals that time hast slowed Meier down at all.Focusing on his work between 2004 and 2009, the book offers a thorough and intimate understanding of Meier’s style—particularly the qualities of light and fluidity across a variety of project sizes—through case studies, photographs, illustrations, renderings and drawings of his recent work. Continue reading...

by Anna Carnick

Comment

Comment

Emerging Landscapes by KLab Architecture

Its amazing how this home interacts with the surrounding environment. The Angles are beautiful and the glass really brings the environment into the home. Notice the details as well - the green roof has a railing, so its really a neat little green terrace you can enjoy and walk on.


Images via Arch Daily

Comment

1 Comment

Slit House by Eastern Design

Interesting how this home is not one I particularly love or would live in, but I can recognize the beauty and really appreciate it as an amazing work of architecture. These slits make me feel a bit cold, but you see the interior picture and the effect it creates with light, and it changes my opinion completely. Its a bit like the famous example of a painting of Hitler - even though I hate Hitler and his image disgusts me, the artist achieved his goal in evoking an emotional response from me. This art work, this home below, evoked an emotional response from me, even though its not a home I would build for myself.


Via Yatzer

1 Comment

Comment

Wooster x Costa Rica

I like the interaction between graffiti and urban architecture! Like the zipper on the side of the building posted last month. There is so much room for creativity and so many interesting examples I've seen in Costa Rica. This one brought to us by the Wooster collective.

Via Wooster Collective

Comment

1 Comment

Puerta a la Vida

If you haven't already, take a look at the new teaser site for Puerta a la Vida... My first project, the result of 5 years of planning, passion, and hard work, and what took me to CR in the first place!Link: Puerta a la Vida

1 Comment

Comment

Moss House

Nendo Studios renovated this house in Tokyo with dry moss and it looks ridiculously cool. The vivid green moss against the white walls really makes it look alive and most of all there is texture! You can touch it and enjoy an experience beyond the mundane flat walls with paint/wallpaper that we are so used to in our everyday lives. Challenge convention and I'll always approve.


Read more at Inhabitat

Comment

Comment

Google x Life Magazine

Google has done it again! They now have every single issue of LIFE magazine every published. This is a ridiculous achievement. Not only is this one of the most coveted collectors magazines, but a cultural staple. I have a nice collection of vintage LIFE mags I picked up at an antique shop in Norwich, CT and I know many people who go nuts about them. Whats amazing about this is that you can actually browse through them so easily and even just look through the covers to get a feel of history. Its a photographic journey through time and so cool to see what made the covers and what was a big deal back in the day. The Year In Pictures - 1972 is one of the coolest, so make sure to check it out.

Take a look yourself!

Comment

Comment

FU-1 house by Takao Akiyama

Experiments in grandeur meet Japanese minimalism. Almost a sure shot to land on a design or architecture site - make it grand - add the Meier wall - big solid color space with connecting structures and large voids. We've discussed this before in some of my earliest posts. I like it, not saying anything bad, just a very popular trend these days in architecture. Like making a Jet Li x DMX film - may not get an Oscar but always a guarantee to make money.

Link

Comment

Comment

Kengo Kuma x MA,YU

Kengo Kuma teams up with Mayumi Ohmori to create a jewelry line inspired by his designs. Normally I stray away from anything about jewelry etc. but this is an exception for Kengo. He is not only one of the most incredible architects of our time, but someone who has inspired even the most famous of architects. He is one of my favorites, and even the inspiration of a high-end clothing line my friend own called Rochambeau. The jewelry really captures the essence of his designs and does great justice to his work. There are some amazing books that showcase his work, but none better that his Selected Works by who else - Rizzoli! Love the book and love anything Rizzoli publishes. When I make a lot of money, I will not spend it on a Ferrari, I will spend it on a Rizzoli library. Yes I am quite sick in the head!



Read on...

Comment

Comment

Noma Bar: Negative Space

To provoke a second glance, Noma Bar expertly uses negative space: his illustrations are formed of both a single image and a series of themed elements that give the final piece its shape.

The Big Squeeze: piece for an article on the oil gains to be made from Iraq

Gun Crime illustration

Fat Cat: for a piece on how CEOs invest their personal wealth

This is The End illustration

See more...

Comment

Comment

Photo of Sydney Today

Dust storm - cool! I was caught in one in Israel once. Hard to imagine how it can be raining sand so hard that you can't see anything at all. No flights, no driving, just engulfed in the redness.

Link

Comment